SAN-RAID devices offer storage options for IP video systems

Designed for use in Storage Area Network, iSCSI SAN-RAID models do not need to be connected to and in

close proximity to DVR or NVR. Instead, units exist as part of network and can store video from one or multiple network recording devices regardless of physical location. Devices utilize iSCSI protocol, which allows them to transmit and receive signals over regular Ethernet cabling. Available with 8, 14, or 42 bays, SAN-RAID models provide storage from 3.3-36 TB.

Vicon Industries Inc., a leading designer and producer of integrated IP video surveillance and access control systems, is replacing its line of RAID storage devices with new iSCSI SAN-RAID models that make use of newer networking and storage technology. Like traditional RAID devices, the new models feature multiple, hot-swappable hard drives that provide highly secure storage of large quantities of recorded digital video. However, the new models are designed for use in a “Storage Area Network,” meaning that they no longer need to be directly, physically connected to and in close proximity to a DVR or NVR. Instead the SAN-RAID units exist as part of a network and can store video from one or multiple network recording devices regardless of their physical location. Compared to the traditional “one-RAID-per-NVR” model, the SAN-RAID option therefore offers savings both in cost and physical space required by the units.

In addition, the new SAN-RAID devices make use of iSCSI protocol, allowing them to transmit and receive signals over regular Ethernet cabling (CAT-5 and other options). iSCSI protocol can transmit signals up to 25x farther than traditional SCSI connections used by the previous generation of RAIDs.

Vicon’s new SAN-RAID devices are available with 8, 14 or 42 bays and provide varying amounts of usable storage, ranging from 3.3 to 36 TB. They will be available for shipment beginning mid July.

“Vicon’s commitment to IP-based, open platform video management is clearly evidenced by the range of products we continue to bring to market, from megapixel cameras to NVRs to these state-of-the-art SAN-RAID storage solutions,” stated Margie Gurwin, Vicon’s Director of Marketing. “We are pleased to offer our customers the best that technology has to offer.”

Posted in Data Storage, iSCSI

New 7-bay NAS Server from Thecus

Thecus announced the availability of its latest 7-bay NAS server, the N7700SAS. The N7700SAS includes seven SATA/SAS hard disk bays that accommodate multiple terabytes of storage. It runs on an Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2GB of DDR2 memory.

For data protection, the N7700SAS lets you choose from a selection of RAID modes, including RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10 and JBOD. The N7700SAS also supports multiple RAID volumes and features online RAID expansion, online RAID migration, and auto rebuild.

Thecus today announced the availability of its latest 7-bay NAS server, the N7700SAS. The N7700SAS includes seven SATA/SAS hard disk bays that accommodate multiple terabytes of storage. It runs on an Intel Core 2 Duo processor and 2GB of DDR2 memory. For data protection, the N7700SAS lets you choose from a selection of RAID modes, including RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 10 and JBOD. The N7700SAS also supports multiple RAID volumes and features online RAID expansion, online RAID migration, and auto rebuild.

The N7700SAS supports multiple file systems, including XFS, EXT3 and ZFS. Users can select the system that they require and create the needed capacity for different applications. The N7700SAS also supports iSCSI initiators and dual-DOM design.

Posted in NAS, RAID Tagged with:

Cisco 4 Bay Advanced Gigabit Network Storage System Chassis

Cisco 4 Bay Advanced Gigabit Network Storage System Chassis information:

The intelligent Cisco NSS6000 4-Bay Advanced Gigabit Storage System Chassis gives administrators and integrators the flexibility to optimize the network storage system (NSS) for performance, capacity, and the company’s storage and sharing needs. The NSS6000 supports up to 132 concurrent, connected Common Internet File Systems (CIFS) (Windows, Macintosh, Linux) users.

The Cisco Small Business Network Storage Systems bring robust network attached storage (NAS) within reach of today’s budget-minded workgroups and small businesses. They are ideal for storing, backing up, sharing and archiving critical information. The feature set of these network storage systems sets them apart from entry-level, desktop NAS systems, while at the same time their competitive pricing gives small businesses the opportunity to realize substantial cost savings when compared with more expensive storage systems.

Unlike other NAS systems, which need to contain operating system software on one or more hard drives, the Cisco Small Business Network Storage Systems feature a unique and intelligent chassis containing the Linux operating system that controls it. This gives the storage system added stability and reliability, as well as the flexibility to be configured without connected drives or reconfigured at any time – even hot swapping and re-sorting hard drives to different storage bays. This flexible architecture makes the Cisco Small Business Network Storage Systems ideally suited for budget-conscious companies that are constantly growing and evolving.

Full specs can be found here and here

Posted in Data Storage

Control your NAS like you control your SAN

Don MacVittie explains that you have a switch that connects various SAN arrays and when your arrays become over-burdened:

“I was pondering over the weekend the concept that a SAN is relatively easy to manage – at least on the surface – because it is, in essence, a network in and of itself. Separated from the IP network, you have a switch that connects various SAN arrays and when your arrays become over-burdened, you can just drop another one in and plug it into the switch. Easy. And since the switch is not generally from the same vendor as the storage array, you can plug in whatever array you find most appealing this week. Migrating data between arrays can be tricky, but these days there are solutions for that. Initialization can be painful, particularly if you want to add it to an existing pool and distribute data across it like it had always been there or you’re using at-rest encryption, but that’s just time you have to wait while it runs, your staff isn’t required unless something goes wrong.

Whither the same type of adaptability and expandability in the NAS space? That’s where devices like our ARX come in. It sits between your machine and your storage, it cares not how much or what brand of storage sits behind it (in fact, at least for ARX, you can even point it at random shares on your Windows servers if you feel the need), and it allows you to just plug in more disk space and manage it centrally. You have the same issues with initial config that you would otherwise have, but the box is then part of the File Virtualization product’s virtual directory, and can be accessed, moved about, whatever.

This is the part where NAS vendors start to huff and puff and talk about their astounding management and integration, and how easy it is to add storage to the system, etc. etc. etc. And they are 100% right. Modern NAS systems are astounding in their versatility and ease of management. As long as they’re homogeneous systems. Throw another vendor on the network and ask the same questions again. You’ll get a set of answers that makes it clear these tools are only for their products.

And that’s one of the many many reasons why a high-quality File (NAS) Virtualization product is more than a little useful. They generally don’t cater to one vendor, they give you all the things you have if you are a single-source shop, but you can apply it to whatever NAS – or even Windows Shared – storage you have in the house. Simplified management, ease of data movement when necessary, you name it. All across whatever hardware you happen to have today or will have in the future.”

source: sys-con.com (101/07/2009)

Posted in NAS

Synology NAS Disk Station Manager (2.2)

The long-awaited firmware, supporting a selection of Synology‘s 7-series, 8-series and 9-series NAS units, introduces a number of new features aimed at delivering a better multimedia experience.

Some of the firmware’s highlights include support for DLNA-compliant devices, a built-in firewall, and integration with Apple’s popular iPhone/iPod touch handsets. With free apps DS Photo and DS Audio, Synology users can now upload photos from their iPhone directly to Disk Station, as well as being able to stream music direct to their handset.

Interested in getting new functionality on your existing Synology NAS? Details of how to apply to join the beta are available by clicking here, and Synology tells us that it’ll award three “valuable” beta testers with a free DS109 NAS when the beta program ends.

Synology lists the key enhancements of the Disk Station Manager 2.2 beta as follows, and a complete list of supported models can be found below.

  • DLNA Compliant Media Server:
  • iPhone Support
  • Mobile Photo Station and File Station
  • iSCSI
  • Firewall
  • SNMP
  • Auto Block
  • Resource Monitor
  • Apple Time Machine Support
  • SMS Notification
  • Windows ADS Support Enhancements:
  • Surveillance Station 2 Enhancements
  • Download Station Enhancements
  • iTunes Server

Full details of the key enhancements can be found here

Posted in Data Storage

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